Brackets and shelves

It sounds like a section in a Bunnings hardware store. But it is also a group of fungi that are at the moment adorning wood, both live and dead, in the district. The fungi are characterised by semi-circular shapes called conks, which are the fruiting bodies containing the spores. These fungi can be parasitic where the fungus feeds off the host plant, or saprotrophic where fungus gain nutrients by digesting dead or decaying wood.

White Punk (Laetiporus portentosus)

White Punk (Laetiporus portentosus)

They vary in size from the White Punk (Laetiporus portentosus), about 250 mm across, hanging on a Red Stringybark (Eucalyptus macrorhyncha) to the Rosette Fungus (Podoscypha petalodes), only a couple of centimetres in width.

Rosette Fungus (Podoscypha petalodes)

Rosette Fungus (Podoscypha petalodes)

The names are advisory only. To get an accurate identification of fungi you could (a) take a spore print – and I am reluctant to deliberately break off a mushroom despite the multitude of them, (b) note the colour of the spores or (c) examine the size and shape of the spores – most of these are on the micrometre scale (one thousandth of a millimetre) and so I would need a microscope. So my identifications are based on what they look like and where I see them growing. Caveat emptor.

Rainbow Fungus (Trametes versicolour)

Rainbow Fungus (Trametes versicolour)

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

Hairy Curtain Crust (Stereum hirsutum)

Irrespective of size, colour or form I think they all look ‘top shelf’.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s